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Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever Dog Breed Information

In a Sentence:

A small to medium-sized retriever with a distinctive red coat and a playful, energetic personality.

Scientific Name:

Canis lupus familiaris.
Also Known As:Toller
Type:Mammal

Size:

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are considered a Medium-sized dog breed.
Weight:17-23 kg.
Height:48-51 cm (19-20 inches)
Length:45-51 cm.

Lifespan:

The average lifespan of a Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever is 12-14 years.

Behavior:

What type of dog is a Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever, how do they behave and what temperament do they have? See below for a detailed overview of their traits and personality.

Personality & Temperament

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers, also known as Tollers, are known for their high energy, intelligence and friendly personalities. They were originally bred in Canada for hunting waterfowl and their name comes from their unique hunting technique of “tolling,” which involves luring ducks closer to the hunter by playing and splashing in the water.

Tollers are highly trainable and eager to please, making them excellent candidates for obedience and agility competitions. They are also known for their love of water and retrieving and enjoy swimming and playing fetch.

In terms of temperament, Tollers are generally friendly and outgoing with both people and other dogs. They are affectionate with their families and enjoy spending time with them, but can also be independent and self-sufficient. Tollers are known for their high-pitched “scream” or “yodel,” which they use to communicate excitement or frustration.

Tollers require plenty of exercise and mental stimulation to keep them happy and healthy. They do well in active households with plenty of opportunities for outdoor activities and playtime. They also thrive on positive reinforcement training and enjoy learning new tricks and skills.

Overall, Tollers are intelligent, energetic and affectionate dogs that make great companions for active families who are willing to provide them with plenty of exercise and mental stimulation.

Intelligence

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are generally considered to be highly intelligent dogs. They are quick learners and have a strong desire to please their owners, which makes them easy to train. They are also known for their problem-solving abilities and their ability to think on their feet. However, like all dogs, their intelligence can vary depending on the individual dog and their training and socialization experiences.

Trainability

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are generally considered to be intelligent and trainable dogs. They are eager to please their owners and enjoy learning new things. However, like any breed, individual dogs may vary in their trainability and some may be more stubborn or independent than others.

Early socialization and consistent, positive training methods are important for any dog, including Tollers. They respond well to reward-based training methods such as praise, treats and play. They also tend to do well with structured training programs that provide clear boundaries and expectations.

Overall, with patience, consistency and positive reinforcement, Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers can be trained to excel in a variety of activities such as obedience, agility and hunting.

Sleep

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers typically sleep for around 12-14 hours per day, although this can vary depending on their age, activity level and individual needs. Puppies and older dogs may require more sleep, while highly active dogs may need less. It’s important to provide your dog with a comfortable and quiet sleeping area where they can rest undisturbed.

Bark

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are known to be moderate barkers. They may bark to alert their owners of strangers or unusual sounds, but they are not excessive barkers. However, like all dogs, individual temperament and training can also play a role in their barking behavior. Proper training and socialization can help reduce excessive barking.

Drool

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are not known to be excessive droolers. However, like all dogs, they may drool occasionally, especially when they are excited or anticipating food. Overall, they are considered to be a relatively low-drooling breed.

Lick

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are known to be moderate to heavy lickers. They are affectionate dogs and enjoy showing their love and affection by licking their owners. However, excessive licking can also be a sign of anxiety or boredom, so it’s important to monitor their behavior and provide them with enough mental and physical stimulation.

Jump

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are athletic dogs and are capable of jumping up to 4-5 feet high. However, it is important to note that excessive jumping can put strain on their joints and should be avoided.

Dig

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers have a moderate tendency to dig. They were originally bred for hunting and retrieving waterfowl, so they may have a natural instinct to dig in order to find prey or to create a comfortable nesting spot. However, with proper training and exercise, this behavior can be managed and minimized. Providing your dog with plenty of mental and physical stimulation, such as regular walks and playtime, can also help reduce their desire to dig.

Good Fit for You?

Is a Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever the right dog for you? Keep reading to find out how compatible you are with a Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever.

Exercise

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are an active breed that require a significant amount of exercise to maintain their physical and mental health. They should have at least 1-2 hours of exercise per day, which can include walks, runs, hikes, swimming and playing fetch. Mental stimulation, such as training and puzzle toys, is also important for this breed. It is important to note that individual exercise needs may vary based on age, health and activity level.

Space

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are medium-sized dogs that require a moderate amount of space. They are active and energetic dogs that need daily exercise and playtime. A securely fenced yard is ideal for them to run and play, but they can also adapt to apartment living if they receive enough exercise and mental stimulation. It is important to note that they are social dogs and need regular interaction with their owners and other dogs. Overall, they need enough space to move around and play, but their exercise needs are more important than the size of their living space.

Apartment

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are not generally recommended for apartment living. They are active and energetic dogs that require a lot of exercise and mental stimulation. They are also known to be vocal and may bark excessively if they are not given enough attention and exercise. Additionally, they are medium-sized dogs and may feel cramped in a small living space. If you are looking for a dog to keep in an apartment, it is best to consider breeds that are smaller in size and have lower energy levels.

Left Alone

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers do not tolerate being left alone for long periods of time. They are social dogs and thrive on human interaction and attention. If left alone for extended periods, they can become anxious, destructive and develop separation anxiety. It is recommended that they are not left alone for more than 4-6 hours at a time and are provided with plenty of mental and physical stimulation when their owners are away.

Kid/Family Friendly

Yes, Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are generally good with kids and families. They are known for their friendly, outgoing and playful nature, which makes them great companions for children. They are also very loyal and protective of their families, which makes them good watchdogs. However, as with any breed, it is important to supervise interactions between children and dogs and to teach children how to properly interact with dogs to prevent any accidents or injuries.

Perfect Fit

A Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever would be a perfect fit for a household that has an active lifestyle and enjoys spending time outdoors. They are energetic and require daily exercise and mental stimulation. They also thrive in a home with a fenced yard where they can run and play. Additionally, they are affectionate and loyal dogs that enjoy being part of the family and participating in activities with their owners. They are also intelligent and trainable, making them a good fit for households that are willing to invest time and effort into their training and socialization.

Pros and Cons:

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers, also known as Toller, are a medium-sized breed of dog that originated in Nova Scotia, Canada. They are known for their unique hunting skills and friendly personalities. However, owning a Toller may come with some advantages and disadvantages. Here are five pros and cons of owning a Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever:

Pros:
  1. Active lifestyle: Tollers are highly energetic and require regular exercise, making them an ideal companion for people who enjoy an active lifestyle.
  2. Intelligent: Tollers are highly intelligent and trainable, making them easy to teach new tricks and commands.
  3. Friendly: Tollers are known for their friendly and outgoing personalities, making them great family pets and social companions.
  4. Versatile: Tollers are versatile dogs that can be trained for a variety of activities, including hunting, agility and obedience.
  5. Low maintenance: Tollers have a short, water-resistant coat that requires minimal grooming, making them a low-maintenance breed.
Cons:
  1. High energy: Tollers require a lot of exercise and mental stimulation, which can be challenging for owners who are not able to provide them with enough activity.
  2. Separation anxiety: Tollers are known to suffer from separation anxiety, which can lead to destructive behavior when left alone for long periods.
  3. Shedding: Tollers shed heavily twice a year, which can be a challenge for owners who are sensitive to pet hair.
  4. Health issues: Tollers are prone to certain health issues, including hip dysplasia and autoimmune diseases.
  5. Expensive: Tollers can be expensive to purchase from a reputable breeder and their high energy levels may require additional expenses for training and exercise equipment.

Cost:

The cost of a Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever in Australia can vary depending on the breeder, location and pedigree of the dog. On average, you can expect to pay between $2,500 to $4,000 AUD for a puppy from a reputable breeder. However, prices can go up to $5,000 AUD or more for a show-quality puppy with champion bloodlines. It’s important to do your research and find a reputable breeder who health tests their dogs and provides proper care for their puppies.

Breed History:

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers were originally bred in the early 19th century in Nova Scotia, Canada. They were bred specifically for hunting waterfowl, particularly ducks. The breed was developed to lure and retrieve ducks from the water by playing and splashing around the shoreline, which would attract the ducks’ attention and curiosity. The dog would then retrieve the ducks that were shot by the hunter.

The breed is known for its unique hunting style, which involves running, jumping and playing along the water’s edge to attract ducks. They are also excellent swimmers and have a water-repellent coat that helps them stay warm and dry while retrieving ducks from the water.

Today, Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are still used as hunting dogs, but they are also popular family pets due to their friendly and affectionate nature. They are intelligent, trainable and excel in various dog sports such as agility, obedience and flyball.

Current Usage

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers, also known as Toller dogs, are versatile dogs that can be used for various purposes. Here are some of the ways they are currently being used:

  1. Hunting: Tollers were originally bred for hunting waterfowl in Nova Scotia, Canada. They are still used as hunting dogs today, particularly for retrieving ducks and geese. Tollers are known for their high energy, intelligence and strong retrieving instincts, which make them excellent hunting companions.
  2. Agility: Tollers are also popular in agility competitions. They are quick learners and have a natural athleticism that makes them well-suited for this sport. Agility training can also help Tollers burn off excess energy and stay mentally stimulated.
  3. Search and rescue: Tollers have a strong sense of smell and are often used in search and rescue operations. They can track scents over long distances and are trained to locate missing persons or objects.
  4. Therapy dogs: Tollers have a friendly and outgoing personality, which makes them well-suited for therapy work. They can provide comfort and companionship to people in hospitals, nursing homes and other settings.
  5. Pets: Finally, Tollers make great pets for active families. They are loyal, affectionate and love to play. However, they do require a lot of exercise and mental stimulation to stay happy and healthy.

Guard Dogs

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are not typically known for their guarding abilities. They are friendly and outgoing dogs that are more likely to greet strangers with a wagging tail than to act as a guard dog. However, they are known for their intelligence and can be trained to alert their owners to potential threats. Overall, they are better suited as family pets and companions rather than guard dogs.

Where Are They Found?

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are most popular in their country of origin, Canada. They are also popular in the United States, Australia and some European countries such as the Netherlands, Germany and Sweden.

Climate

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are best suited to a moderate climate with cool summers and mild winters. They are bred to work in cold water and can tolerate colder temperatures, but they may struggle in extreme heat. It is important to provide them with shade and plenty of water during hot weather. Additionally, they are adaptable and can live in a variety of climates as long as their needs are met.

Population

It is difficult to determine the exact number of Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers in the world as there is no centralized database or registry. However, according to the American Kennel Club, the breed is ranked 87th in popularity out of 195 breeds recognized by the organization. Additionally, the breed is recognized by several other kennel clubs around the world, including the Canadian Kennel Club and the United Kennel Club. It is estimated that there are several thousand Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers worldwide, but an exact number is not available.

Physical Appearance:

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are medium-sized dogs with a muscular and athletic build. They have a distinctive red or orange coat that is thick and water-repellent, with white markings on their chest, feet and tail tip. Their head is wedge-shaped with a broad skull and a pointed muzzle. They have medium-sized, almond-shaped eyes that are usually amber or brown in color. Their ears are triangular and set high on their head and they have a strong neck that slopes down to their broad shoulders. Their tail is thick and furry and it curls over their back when they are excited or alert. Overall, Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers have a friendly and alert expression and they are known for their high energy and playful nature.

Coat:

Colours:

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers can be various shades of red, ranging from a golden red to a dark coppery red. They may also have white markings on their chest, feet and tail tip. However, any other colors or markings are considered a fault in the breed standard.

Hair/Fur Length:

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers have a medium-length double coat. The fur is dense and water-repellent, with a soft undercoat and longer guard hairs on top. The fur on the tail is longer and bushier, giving it a distinctive “tolling” appearance when the dog is working. Regular grooming is necessary to keep their coat healthy and free of mats.

Shedding:

Yes, Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers do shed. They have a double coat that sheds moderately throughout the year, with heavier shedding during the spring and fall. Regular brushing and grooming can help minimize shedding and keep their coat healthy.

Grooming:

The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever has a thick double coat that sheds moderately throughout the year and heavily during shedding season. They require regular brushing to remove loose fur and prevent matting. A slicker brush and a metal comb are recommended for grooming.

The breed does not need to have its hair cut, but trimming the fur around the ears, paws and tail may be necessary for hygiene purposes. It is important to regularly check and clean their ears to prevent infections.

Overall, the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever requires moderate grooming to maintain their coat’s health and appearance.

Hypoallergenic:

No, Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are not considered hypoallergenic. They shed moderately and produce dander, which can trigger allergic reactions in some people. However, some individuals with allergies may be able to tolerate being around them better than other breeds due to their low-shedding coat. It is always recommended to spend time with a dog before bringing them into your home if you have allergies.

Speed:

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers can run up to 48 kph (30 mph).

Health:

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are generally healthy dogs, but like all breeds, they can be prone to certain health issues. Some of the most common health issues they may face include:

  • Hip dysplasia: a genetic condition where the hip joint doesn’t develop properly, leading to arthritis and lameness.
  • Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA): a group of genetic diseases that cause the retina to degenerate, leading to blindness.
  • Collie eye anomaly (CEA): a genetic condition that affects the development of the eye, leading to vision problems and blindness.
  • Autoimmune thyroiditis: an autoimmune disorder where the immune system attacks the thyroid gland, leading to low thyroid hormone levels and a range of symptoms.
  • Addison’s disease: a hormonal disorder where the adrenal glands don’t produce enough cortisol, leading to weakness, lethargy and other symptoms.

Teeth:

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers typically have 42 teeth, which is the same as most other breeds of dogs.

Eyesight:

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are known for their exceptional eyesight. Their eyes are well-adapted for hunting and retrieving, with a keen ability to spot and track moving objects, even in low light conditions. Their eyes are also well-suited for their role as water retrievers, with a protective third eyelid that helps keep their eyes moist and clear while swimming. Overall, the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever’s eyesight is a key factor in their success as a hunting and retrieving breed.

Nipples:

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers typically have 8 to 10 nipples, arranged in two rows on their underside.

Gestation:

Litter Size:

The typical litter size for Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers is 5-7 puppies. However, litter sizes can vary and may be smaller or larger depending on various factors such as the age and health of the mother, genetics and breeding practices.

Gestation Period:

The gestation period for Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers is typically around 63 days, which is the same as most other dog breeds. However, the actual length of gestation can vary slightly from dog to dog and can range from 58 to 68 days. It is important to monitor the pregnant dog closely during this time and provide proper care and nutrition to ensure a healthy pregnancy and delivery.

Heat:

Female Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers typically go into heat twice a year, although this can vary from dog to dog. The first heat usually occurs between six and twelve months of age and subsequent heats occur every six to eight months.

Male vs Female:

Male and female Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers (Tollers) have some physical and behavioral differences. Males are generally larger and heavier than females, with a height of 18-21 inches and a weight of 45-51 pounds, while females are 17-20 inches tall and weigh 37-44 pounds. Males tend to have a more muscular build and a broader head, while females have a more refined appearance. In terms of temperament, females are often more independent and reserved, while males are more outgoing and playful. However, these differences can vary depending on the individual dog’s personality and training.

Tips and Advice:

As a highly energetic and intelligent breed, Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers require a lot of attention and care to ensure they remain healthy and happy. Here are some tips and advice for caring for a Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever:

  • Exercise: These dogs require a lot of exercise to burn off their energy. Daily walks, runs and playtime are essential to keep them physically and mentally stimulated.
  • Training: Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are highly intelligent and trainable. Consistent and positive training is important to prevent behavioral issues.
  • Grooming: Regular grooming is necessary to keep their thick double coat in good condition. Brushing at least once a week and occasional baths are recommended.
  • Health: Regular vet check-ups and vaccinations are important to keep your dog healthy. They are prone to certain health issues such as hip dysplasia and eye problems, so it’s important to be aware of these and take preventative measures.
  • Diet: A healthy and balanced diet is important for their overall health and wellbeing. Consult with your vet to determine the best diet for your dog’s needs.
  • Socialization: Early socialization is important to prevent shyness and aggression towards strangers and other animals. Expose your dog to different people, animals and environments to help them become well-adjusted and confident.
  • Mental stimulation: These dogs are highly intelligent and require mental stimulation to prevent boredom. Puzzle toys, training exercises and interactive playtime can help keep them mentally stimulated.
  • Safety: Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are natural hunters and may have a strong prey drive. It’s important to keep them on a leash or in a secure area to prevent them from running off or chasing after small animals.

By following these tips and advice, you can ensure that your Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever remains healthy, happy and well-behaved.

Food:

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are medium-sized dogs that typically weigh between 35-50 pounds. They have a high metabolism and are very active, so they require a diet that is high in protein and nutrients. As a general rule, they should eat about 1-2 cups of high-quality dog food per day, depending on their age, size and activity level.

In terms of their food orientation, Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are known to be food motivated and enjoy treats and rewards. However, it’s important to monitor their food intake and not overfeed them, as they can be prone to obesity if they are not given enough exercise. It’s also important to choose healthy, low-calorie treats and avoid giving them table scraps or human food, which can be harmful to their health.

Facts:

The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever is a unique breed of dog that was originally bred in Nova Scotia, Canada, for hunting waterfowl. Here are three interesting facts about this breed:

  1. They have a unique hunting technique: The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever is known for its unique hunting technique called “tolling” This involves the dog running and playing along the shoreline to attract ducks towards the hunter’s blind.
  2. They have webbed feet: This breed has webbed feet, which makes them excellent swimmers and helps them to retrieve ducks from the water.
  3. They are highly intelligent: The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever is a highly intelligent breed that is easy to train. They excel in obedience, agility and other dog sports.

Names:

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are known for their playful and energetic personalities, as well as their love for water and retrieving. Names that suit this breed often have a strong and lively feel to them. Here are 15 names that would be a good fit for a Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever:

1. Tucker6. Cooper11. Chase
2. Finn7. Marley12. River
3. Scout8. Sadie13. Willow
4. Bailey9. Rosie14. Nova
5. Hunter10. Maverick15. Blaze

Famous:

The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever is a beloved breed known for its intelligence, athleticism and striking appearance. While many Tollers have made their mark in various fields, a few stand out as particularly famous. Here are some of the most famous Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers of all time:

  1. Tucker – Tucker is a Toller owned by Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. He has become a bit of a celebrity in his own right, appearing in photos with his famous owner and even making an appearance on the cover of a Canadian magazine.
  2. Toller 007 – Toller 007, whose real name is Javahill’s Locked N Loaded, is a Toller who gained fame for his incredible agility skills. He has won numerous championships and even appeared on the TV show America’s Got Talent.
  3. Cooper – Cooper is a Toller who starred in the movie “Megan Leavey,” which tells the story of a Marine and her bomb-sniffing dog. Cooper played the role of Rex, the dog who becomes Megan’s loyal companion.
  4. Sailor – Sailor is a Toller who made headlines for his incredible feat of swimming over 1,000 miles down the Columbia River. He was on a journey with his owner, who was kayaking the river and became something of a local celebrity along the way.
  5. Toller Cranberry – Toller Cranberry is a Toller who gained fame for her role in a series of commercials for Subaru. She played the part of a loyal companion to a family of adventurers, showcasing the breed’s athleticism and intelligence.

These are just a few of the most famous Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers of all time. Whether they’re performing incredible feats or simply stealing hearts with their good looks, Tollers have a way of making an impression on those around them.

Summary:

The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever, also known as Toller, is a medium-sized breed of dog that originated in Nova Scotia, Canada. Tollers are a type of retriever, specifically bred for hunting and retrieving waterfowl. They are known for their distinctive red-orange coat, which is thick and water-repellent.

Tollers are intelligent, energetic and affectionate dogs. They are highly trainable and excel in activities such as obedience, agility and flyball. They are also excellent swimmers and love to retrieve objects from the water. Tollers are known for their playful and outgoing personalities and they get along well with children and other pets.

The breed’s history can be traced back to the early 19th century when hunters in Nova Scotia began breeding dogs specifically for hunting waterfowl. Tollers were developed by crossing various breeds, including retrievers, spaniels and setters. The breed was officially recognized by the Canadian Kennel Club in 1945 and by the American Kennel Club in 2001.

Tollers make great pets for active families who enjoy outdoor activities such as hiking, swimming and playing fetch. They require regular exercise and mental stimulation to prevent boredom and destructive behavior. Tollers are loyal and affectionate companions who thrive on human interaction and attention. They are also known for their excellent watchdog abilities and will alert their owners to any potential threats.