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Saluki

Saluki Dog Breed Information

In a Sentence:

A graceful and elegant sighthound with long legs and a slender body.

Scientific Name:

Canis lupus familiaris.
Type:Mammal

Size:

Salukis are considered a Medium-sized dog breed.
Weight:20-30 kg.
Height:58-71 cm (23-28 inches)
Length:60-70 cm.

Lifespan:

The average lifespan of a Saluki is around 12-14 years

Behavior:

What type of dog is a Saluki, how do they behave and what temperament do they have? See below for a detailed overview of their traits and personality.

Personality & Temperament

  • Salukis are known for their elegant and regal appearance, but they also have a unique personality and temperament. Here is a detailed overview of Salukis’ personality, temperament and behavior:
  • Salukis are independent and intelligent dogs. They are not clingy or overly affectionate, but they do form strong bonds with their owners. They are also known for their quiet and reserved nature. Salukis are not typically barkers and they tend to be calm and composed in most situations.
  • Salukis are gentle and sensitive dogs. They are not aggressive or confrontational and they usually get along well with other dogs and animals. However, they can be shy or aloof around strangers and they may take some time to warm up to new people. Salukis are also known for their high prey drive, which means they may chase small animals like squirrels or rabbits.
  • Salukis are active dogs that enjoy running and playing. They have a strong hunting instinct, so they need plenty of exercise and mental stimulation to stay happy and healthy. Salukis are also known for their grace and speed and they excel in activities like lure coursing and agility. However, they are not always the easiest dogs to train. Salukis can be stubborn and independent and they may not always listen to commands.

Overall, Salukis are unique and fascinating dogs with a distinct personality and temperament. They are loyal and loving companions, but they also have a strong independent streak that requires patience and understanding from their owners.

Intelligence

Salukis are considered to be intelligent dogs. They are known for their independent thinking and problem-solving abilities. They are also quick learners and have a good memory, which makes them easy to train. However, like all dogs, their intelligence can vary depending on their individual personality and training.

Trainability

Salukis are generally independent and intelligent dogs, which can make them somewhat challenging to train. They have a strong prey drive and may be easily distracted by sights, sounds and smells. However, with patience, consistency and positive reinforcement techniques, Salukis can be trained effectively. It is important to start training early and to socialize them well with people and other animals. Salukis respond well to gentle, reward-based training methods and they thrive on praise and positive attention from their owners. With proper training and socialization, Salukis can become well-behaved, obedient and loyal companions.

Sleep

Salukis, like most dogs, sleep for an average of 12-14 hours per day. However, the amount of sleep they need can vary depending on their age, activity level and overall health. Puppies and older dogs may require more sleep, while highly active Salukis may need less. It’s important to provide your Saluki with a comfortable and quiet sleeping area to ensure they get the rest they need.

Bark

Salukis are known for being relatively quiet dogs and are not known to bark excessively. However, like all dogs, they may bark in certain situations such as when they are excited, scared or trying to alert their owners of something. Overall, Salukis are not considered to be a particularly vocal breed.

Drool

Salukis are not known for excessive drooling. They are generally a clean breed and do not drool much, if at all. However, like all dogs, some Salukis may drool occasionally, especially when they are excited or anticipating food. Overall, Salukis are not considered to be heavy droolers.

Lick

Salukis, like most dogs, lick as a form of communication and affection. However, the amount of licking can vary from dog to dog and depends on their individual personality and behavior. Some Salukis may be more prone to licking than others, but excessive licking can also be a sign of anxiety or stress. If you are concerned about your Saluki’s licking behavior, it is best to consult with a veterinarian or a professional dog trainer for guidance.

Jump

Salukis are known for their agility and athleticism and they can jump quite high. While the exact height they can jump varies from dog to dog, on average, Salukis can jump up to 6 feet high. However, this can also depend on factors such as their age, weight and overall health. It’s important to note that excessive jumping can be harmful to a Saluki’s joints, so it’s best to monitor their jumping and provide appropriate exercise and training.

Dig

Salukis are not known to be excessive diggers. However, like all dogs, they may dig occasionally, especially if they are bored or trying to escape from a fenced area. Providing enough exercise and mental stimulation can help prevent digging behavior in Salukis.

Good Fit for You?

Is a Saluki the right dog for you? Keep reading to find out how compatible you are with a Saluki.

Exercise

Salukis are a highly active breed that require a lot of exercise. They need at least 60-90 minutes of exercise per day, which can include walks, runs and playtime in a fenced yard. Salukis also enjoy activities such as lure coursing, agility and hiking. It’s important to note that Salukis have a strong prey drive and should always be kept on a leash or in a securely fenced area when outside.

Space

Salukis are a large breed of dog that require a decent amount of space to live comfortably. They are known for their athleticism and love to run, so a large yard or access to open spaces is ideal for them. However, they can adapt to living in smaller spaces as long as they receive enough exercise and mental stimulation. It’s important to note that Salukis are sensitive dogs and need a calm and peaceful environment, so a quiet and low-traffic area is best for them. Overall, Salukis need enough space to move around, play and relax comfortably.

Apartment

Salukis are not typically recommended for apartment living. They are a large breed and require a lot of space to run and play. They also have high energy levels and need plenty of exercise and mental stimulation. Without enough space and exercise, they can become bored and destructive. Additionally, Salukis are known for their vocalization and may disturb neighbors in close quarters. If you live in an apartment, it may be better to consider a smaller breed or a dog with lower exercise requirements.

Left Alone

Salukis are known to be independent dogs, but they still require socialization and attention from their owners. They may tolerate being left alone for short periods of time, but they are not recommended for people who are away from home for long periods of time. Salukis are social animals and thrive on human interaction, so leaving them alone for extended periods can lead to separation anxiety and destructive behavior. If you have to leave your Saluki alone for a few hours, make sure they have access to water, food and a comfortable place to rest. It’s also a good idea to provide them with toys and puzzles to keep them occupied while you’re away.

Kid/Family Friendly

Yes, Salukis can be good with kids and families if they are socialized and trained properly from a young age. They are generally gentle, loyal and affectionate dogs that enjoy spending time with their owners. However, it is important to supervise interactions between children and Salukis to ensure that both are safe and comfortable. Salukis are also known for their high prey drive, so they may not be the best fit for families with small pets.

Perfect Fit

Salukis are a great fit for households that have a lot of space and a yard for them to run around in. They are also best suited for families that have an active lifestyle and are willing to provide them with plenty of exercise and mental stimulation. Salukis are independent dogs and may not be the best choice for first-time dog owners or those who are looking for a lap dog. They are also not recommended for households with small children or other pets, as they have a strong prey drive and may chase smaller animals. Overall, Salukis are best suited for experienced dog owners who are willing to provide them with the attention, exercise and training they need to thrive.

Pros and Cons:

Salukis are a breed of dog known for their grace and speed. They are often used for hunting and make great companions for active owners. However, owning a Saluki comes with both advantages and disadvantages. Here are five pros and cons of owning a Saluki:

ProsCons
1. Loyal and affectionate companions1. High energy levels require daily exercise and mental stimulation
2. Low grooming needs due to short hair2. Can be difficult to train and may have a strong prey drive
3. Good with children and other pets when socialized properly3. Can be sensitive and may not do well with harsh training methods
4. Excellent runners and enjoy outdoor activities4. Prone to certain health issues such as hip dysplasia and heart problems
5. Independent and self-sufficient dogs5. Can be expensive to purchase and maintain due to their rarity and specialized needs

Overall, owning a Saluki can be a rewarding experience for the right owner who is willing to provide the necessary care and attention.

Cost:

The cost of a Saluki in Australia can vary depending on several factors such as the breeder, location, age and pedigree. On average, a Saluki puppy can cost between $2,500 to $5,000 AUD. However, some breeders may charge more for puppies with exceptional pedigrees or show potential. It is important to do thorough research and only purchase from reputable breeders to ensure the health and well-being of the puppy.

Breed History:

Salukis were originally bred for hunting in the deserts of the Middle East, particularly in the Arabian Peninsula and Egypt. They were used by Bedouin nomads to hunt gazelles, hares and other small game for food. Salukis are known for their speed, endurance and agility, which made them ideal for chasing prey across vast stretches of desert terrain. They were also valued for their loyalty and affectionate nature and were often kept as pets by their owners. Today, Salukis are still used for hunting in some parts of the world, but they are also popular as show dogs and companions.

Current Usage

Salukis are primarily used as companion animals and show dogs, but they also have a history of being used as hunting dogs. In some parts of the world, particularly in the Middle East, Salukis are still used for hunting purposes. They are known for their speed and agility and their ability to track and catch prey. In addition, Salukis have been used in search and rescue operations, as therapy dogs and as service animals for people with disabilities. However, their primary role today is as a beloved pet and companion.

Guard Dogs

Salukis are not typically used as guard dogs. They are hunting dogs and were bred to chase prey, not to protect their owners or property. Salukis are generally friendly and gentle with people and they are not known for their protective instincts. While they may bark to alert their owners of strangers or unusual activity, they are not aggressive enough to be effective guard dogs.

Where Are They Found?

Salukis are most popular in the Middle East, particularly in countries such as Iran, Iraq and Saudi Arabia, where they are highly valued for their hunting abilities and are considered a symbol of status and wealth. They are also popular in other parts of the world, including the United States, United Kingdom, Australia and Canada, where they are primarily kept as companion animals and show dogs.

Climate

Salukis are best suited to a warm and dry climate. They have a thin coat that provides little insulation, so they can become uncomfortable in cold and damp weather. They also do not tolerate extreme heat and humidity very well, so it is important to provide them with plenty of shade and water during hot weather. Overall, a moderate climate with mild temperatures and low humidity is ideal for Salukis.

Population

It is difficult to determine the exact number of Salukis in the world as there is no centralized database or registry for this breed. However, it is estimated that there are several thousand Salukis worldwide, with the majority of them being in the Middle East and Europe. In the United States, the Saluki is a relatively rare breed, with only a few hundred registered with the American Kennel Club each year.

Physical Appearance:

Salukis are a graceful and elegant breed of dog. They have a slender and athletic build with long, lean legs that are well-muscled. Their heads are long and narrow with a slightly curved profile and their ears are long and floppy. Salukis have a deep chest and a slim waist, giving them a streamlined appearance. Their coats are silky and smooth, with feathering on their legs, tail and ears. They come in a variety of colors, including cream, fawn, red, black and tri-color. Salukis have a regal and dignified demeanor and their eyes are often described as soulful and expressive. Overall, Salukis are a strikingly beautiful breed with a unique and distinctive appearance.

Coat:

Colours:

Salukis can come in a variety of colors, including:Cream,Fawn,Red,Black,White,Golden,Grizzle,Tricolor (black, white and tan),Brindle (striped),Parti-color (two or more colors in patches). It’s important to note that some colors are more rare than others and may not be recognized by all breed standards.

Hair/Fur Length:

Salukis have long hair that is silky and feathered on their ears, legs and tail. The hair on their body is short and smooth.

Shedding:

Yes, Salukis do shed. They have a short, smooth coat that sheds moderately throughout the year. However, they are not heavy shedders like some other breeds. Regular brushing can help to remove loose hair and keep shedding under control. Salukis also have a seasonal shedding period in which they shed their undercoat in preparation for warmer weather. During this time, they may shed more heavily than usual.

Grooming:

The Saluki has a short, smooth coat that requires minimal grooming. They shed moderately throughout the year and a weekly brushing with a soft-bristled brush will help to remove loose hair and keep their coat shiny. They do not need to be bathed frequently unless they get particularly dirty or smelly.

Salukis do not require haircuts as their coat naturally sheds and grows to maintain a healthy length. However, they may need occasional trimming around their paws, ears and tail to keep them neat and tidy. It is important to note that Salukis have sensitive skin, so it is best to use a gentle shampoo and avoid harsh grooming tools.

Hypoallergenic:

Salukis are not considered hypoallergenic dogs. They have a short, smooth coat that sheds moderately, which can cause allergies in some people. However, some individuals with allergies may be able to tolerate Salukis better than other breeds due to their low dander production. It’s important to note that no dog breed is completely hypoallergenic and individuals with allergies should spend time with a Saluki before committing to ownership.

Speed:

Salukis are known for their incredible speed and can run up to 68 kph (42 mph).

Health:

Salukis are generally healthy dogs, but like all breeds, they can be prone to certain health issues. Some of the most common health issues faced by Salukis include:

  1. Hip dysplasia – a condition where the hip joint doesn’t develop properly, leading to arthritis and pain.
  2. Eye problems – Salukis can be prone to eye conditions such as cataracts, progressive retinal atrophy and glaucoma.
  3. Hypothyroidism – a condition where the thyroid gland doesn’t produce enough hormones, leading to weight gain, lethargy and skin problems.
  4. Cancer – Salukis can be prone to various types of cancer, including lymphoma and osteosarcoma.
  5. Heart problems – Salukis can be prone to heart conditions such as dilated cardiomyopathy and mitral valve disease.
  6. Bloat – a condition where the stomach fills with gas and twists, which can be life-threatening if not treated promptly.
  7. Allergies – Salukis can be prone to allergies, which can cause skin irritation, itching and ear infections.

Teeth:

Salukis typically have 42 teeth, which is the same as most other breeds of dogs.

Eyesight:

Salukis are known for their exceptional eyesight, which is one of the reasons they are highly valued as hunting dogs. Their keen eyesight allows them to spot prey from a distance and track it with precision. In fact, Salukis have been known to see and chase prey up to a mile away. This ability is due to their large, almond-shaped eyes and the high number of rods and cones in their retinas, which allow them to see in low light conditions and detect movement with great accuracy.

Nipples:

Salukis typically have 8 to 10 nipples, arranged in two rows on their underside.

Gestation:

Litter Size:

The typical litter size for Salukis is between 4 to 8 puppies. However, litter size can vary depending on factors such as the age and health of the mother, genetics and environmental factors.

Gestation Period:

The gestation period for Salukis is approximately 63 days. However, it can range from 58 to 68 days.

Heat:

Salukis typically go into heat twice a year, but the timing can vary slightly between individuals.

Male vs Female:

Male and female Salukis have some physical and behavioral differences. Males are generally larger and heavier than females, with a height of 23-28 inches and a weight of 45-65 pounds, while females are 21-26 inches tall and weigh 35-55 pounds. Females tend to have a more refined and delicate appearance, with a narrower head and a more slender build, while males have a broader head and a more muscular body. In terms of temperament, females are often more independent and reserved, while males are more affectionate and outgoing. However, these differences can vary depending on the individual dog and their upbringing.

Tips and Advice:

Salukis are a beautiful and elegant breed of dog that require specific care and attention. Here are some tips and advice for caring for a Saluki:

  • Exercise: Salukis are a high-energy breed that require daily exercise. They love to run, so a fenced-in yard or a large open space is ideal for them to stretch their legs. Daily walks or runs are also necessary to keep them happy and healthy.
  • Grooming: Salukis have a short, smooth coat that requires minimal grooming. Weekly brushing and occasional baths are all that is needed to keep them looking their best. They also have long, floppy ears that need to be checked and cleaned regularly to prevent infections.
  • Diet: Salukis are prone to obesity, so it’s important to feed them a high-quality diet that is appropriate for their age and activity level. Avoid overfeeding and giving them table scraps, as this can lead to weight gain and other health issues.
  • Training: Salukis are intelligent and independent dogs that can be challenging to train. Positive reinforcement methods work best and early socialization is important to prevent shyness or aggression towards strangers and other animals.
  • Health: Salukis are generally healthy dogs, but they are prone to certain health issues such as hip dysplasia, heart problems and eye diseases. Regular check-ups with a veterinarian and keeping up with vaccinations and preventative care is important for their overall health and well-being.
  • Safety: Salukis are sight hounds and have a strong prey drive, so it’s important to keep them on a leash or in a securely fenced area when outside. They can easily become distracted by small animals and run off, which can be dangerous for them and others.
  • Companionship: Salukis are loyal and affectionate dogs that thrive on human companionship. They do well in homes where someone is home most of the day or with another dog for companionship. They are not recommended for homes with small children or other small pets, as their prey drive can be too strong.

Food:

The amount of food a Saluki needs depends on their age, size and activity level. As a general rule, adult Salukis typically eat between 1.5 and 2.5 cups of high-quality dry food per day, divided into two meals. However, it’s important to note that every dog is different and you should consult with your veterinarian to determine the appropriate amount of food for your specific Saluki.

Salukis are not typically considered to be food-oriented dogs. They are independent and can be somewhat aloof, which means they may not be as motivated by food as some other breeds. However, like all dogs, Salukis enjoy treats and may become food-oriented if they are overindulged or given too many high-value treats. It’s important to maintain a healthy balance of treats and regular meals to prevent obesity and other health issues.

Facts:

Salukis are a breed of dog that are known for their grace, speed and elegance. Here are three interesting facts about Salukis:

  1. Salukis are one of the oldest breeds of domesticated dogs, with evidence of their existence dating back to ancient Egypt.
  2. Salukis have a unique hunting style that involves using their keen eyesight to spot prey from a distance and then chasing it down at high speeds.
  3. Salukis are often referred to as the “”royal dog of Egypt”” due to their historical association with royalty and their depiction in ancient Egyptian art.

Names:

Salukis are a breed of dog that originated in the Middle East and are known for their grace, speed and elegance. These dogs are often given names that reflect their regal and exotic nature. Here are 15 names that would be a good fit for a Saluki:

  1. Aziza – meaning “beloved” in Arabic
  2. Zara – meaning “princess” in Arabic
  3. Farid – meaning “unique” or “precious” in Arabic
  4. Amir – meaning “prince” in Arabic
  5. Layla – meaning “night” in Arabic
  6. Nuri – meaning “my light” in Arabic
  7. Aria – meaning “air” or “song” in Italian
  8. Sable – a color that is often seen in Salukis
  9. Sahara – a nod to the breed’s Middle Eastern origins
  10. Zephyr – meaning “west wind”
  11. Kahlua – a nod to the breed’s coffee-colored coat
  12. Orion – a constellation known for its speed and agility
  13. Phoenix – a mythical bird known for its grace and beauty
  14. Sabre – a nod to the breed’s hunting heritage
  15. Zenith – meaning “highest point” or “peak” in English.

Famous:

Salukis are known for their grace, speed and beauty and have been cherished by people for thousands of years. Over the years, many Salukis have become famous for their incredible feats, appearances in movies and ownership by famous people. Some of the most famous Salukis of all time include:

  1. Tazi – A Saluki owned by Alexander the Great, who was said to have been so devoted to his dog that he named a city after him.
  2. Farida – A Saluki who was owned by Queen Elizabeth II and was a beloved companion for many years.
  3. Bongo – A Saluki who starred in the movie “The Thief of Bagdad” in 1924 and became one of the most famous dogs in Hollywood.
  4. Snuppy – A Saluki who was the first cloned dog in the world, born in 2005 in South Korea.
  5. Ch. Bagdad’s Kennel Sultan – A Saluki who won Best in Show at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in 1954, becoming the first Saluki to win the prestigious award.
  6. Ch. Shah of Persia of Grandeur – A Saluki who won Best in Show at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in 1929, becoming the first Saluki to win the award.
  7. Ch. Impala Golden Khan – A Saluki who won Best in Show at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in 1971, becoming the first Saluki to win the award in over 40 years.

These Salukis have left a lasting legacy and have helped to make the breed one of the most beloved and admired in the world.

Summary:

The Saluki is a type of sighthound that originated in the Middle East and is one of the oldest known dog breeds. They are known for their grace, speed and endurance and were traditionally used for hunting game such as gazelles and hares.

Salukis are typically gentle, affectionate and loyal dogs, but can be reserved or aloof with strangers. They are independent thinkers and may be difficult to train, but respond well to positive reinforcement and consistency. Salukis are also known for their high energy levels and need for regular exercise.

In terms of appearance, Salukis have a long, slender build with a narrow head and long, floppy ears. They come in a variety of colors, including cream, fawn, red, black and white.

As a pet, Salukis can make wonderful companions for the right owner. They are best suited for experienced dog owners who have the time and dedication to provide them with the exercise and mental stimulation they need. Salukis may not be the best choice for families with young children or other pets, as they have a strong prey drive and may be prone to chasing smaller animals.